StylingSeries: Juliana Salazar

Juliana Salazar – art director, creative strategist, stylist – discusses the dualities of her personal style and the way 2020 helped her settle into the creative chaos of a multi-hyphenate career.
StylingSeries: Juliana Salazar

How would you describe your personal style? 

I would describe my personal style as a bunch of juxtapositions – I can be really casual and girly; other times,  I’m much more of a tomboy, but also more dressed up. I love the duality of two things that don’t typically go together. Basketball shorts with embellished satin slides, or a sheer dress with chunky oxfords, for example.

I’m pretty low-maintenance, which definitely plays into my style, too. I used to go to all the fashion shows and was always surrounded by people who were very dressed up, changing outfits for every show, etc. A lot of it felt inauthentic. It made me really lean into the simplicity in which I approached getting dressed. Simple, but not boring. At the end of day, you wear your clothes; your clothes don’t wear you. Some people can wear a white t-shirt and make it look amazing, because of the energy they wear it with and how they carry themselves. 

Juliana wears The Plunge in Black.

How is the state of the world shifting your hopes or expectations for the future of fashion?

I am pretty optimistic about the future of fashion. The problems we are being confronted with right now have always existed. Now, though, the solutions that were once dismissed as radical or impossible are the only way forward. 

At this point, I don’t think there is any space left for those who are not committed to putting in the time and effort to be better. Whether it’s creating better practices, environments, products— being a better employee or employer— everyone is being presented with an opportunity to do better right now. I definitely have high hopes. 

 


How has 2020 shaped the way you view your role as a stylist & creative? 

In a weird way, 2020 has made me feel the most accepting of how I navigate the chaos of my career. I’ve always struggled with how I view myself in terms of job roles— I never wanted to be confined to a single role and have yet to find one title that I felt comfortable throwing over my work. I used to go crazy trying to figure it all out, but I'm glad I never did. Exploring my multiple interests has allowed me to diversify my income: something that 2020 has confirmed to be very important. 

Juliana wears The Plunge in Grass. Shop Similar Styles.

How did you style your first look? 

These pants are from Peter Do. I discovered him around two years ago through Tumblr, and really love the clothes he makes. I always have a pair of pants like this in my wardrobe. I love greens as a neutral-- sometimes black feels too heavy. 

I love items that are really effortless like this top. It is easy to throw on with almost anything, yet not boring or simple at all. I love to wear sheer things, which makes undergarments so important. I love that CUUP holds you in, while smoothing you down. 

Juliana wears The Scoop in Black and The Highwaist in Black.

How did you style your second look? 

This outfit is that quintessential juxtaposition of girly and tomboy; casual, but also not. This is definitely an occasion dress, but when I throw a big men’s jacket over it and loafers, it becomes an easy go-to outfit of mine.  I like to be covered and comfortable. That includes my first layer.  

An intentional first layer makes you feel more grown up. Matching your underwear to your bra is kind of the equivalent of a business blazer. I’m ready to get things done. Life can be chaotic and sometimes I feel like I’m faking it until I make it, so anchoring yourself in a foundation that makes you feel mature and put together really makes all the difference. 



Juliana wears The Scoop in Black and The Highwaist in Black.

How did you style your third look? 

I have a growing collection of wide-legged pants that I love to wear, and I’m always layering this jacket on top. I love layering-- the right layers are sometimes all you need.

This outfit is something I’d throw on when I am trying to look a bit more feminine. Sometimes, when I can’t sleep, I check the weather and mentally prepare my outfit for the next day. Getting dressed dictates how your whole day will go.  


What is the legacy – both in fashion & the world at large – that you'd like to leave behind? 

This is an extremely daunting question to me, an ambitious over-thinker, but my general sentiment is that I want to know enough to be better. To live in a way that continuously builds upon the life my parents gave me. 

I have little to nothing figured out, but if I’m not living and working in a way that helps progress culture or advance humanity, I’m not sure what the point of existing is. I know this sounds quite ambitious, but this can just be a conversation that inspires someone else to also be and do better. We all underrate the simple effect that being a good, moral person can have on one another. 



Tags: , StylingSeries

More Bodytalk

SupportSystem

SupportSystem

We Support Healthcare Heros

In May, we asked healthcare workers from the CUUP community to share their stories from the medical frontlines. This week, we’re celebrating their continued commitment. Join us by reading their inspiring, humbling stories – and thanking the frontline workers in your community.

Read more

SupportSystem

SupportSystem

Revising the Story of Reproductive Health

We asked Attia Taylor – founder and EIC of Womanly Magazine – about reclaiming sexual education, the healing power of personal stories & the need for healthcare that fits everyone.

Read more

StylingSeries

StylingSeries

StylingSeries: Sade Mims

Sade Mims – designer & founder of accessories brand Edas– discusses her nostalgic & eclectic style, her entrepreneurship journey & the ways she looks backwards to make things for now.

Read more

Issue No. 59

Issue No. 59

Bee Shapiro

Bee Shapiro – NYT beauty columnist & founder of Ellis Brooklyn – discusses the rich science behind our sense of smell & the ways she is reclaiming the scent of sensuality from decades of male noses.

Read more

Comments

Comments will need to be approved before being published

Join the Conversation